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Author Topic: How To: Install Oil Cooler Kit on a 696  (Read 11456 times)
Bladecutter
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« on: June 03, 2009, 08:04:59 PM »

Hey there everyone.
Just thought I would put up a picture guide to installing an oil cooler kit onto a 696 that I did for my gf today.

Pretty easy process, that should take about 2 to 3 hours.

The first part of the install process is to have a 696, an oil cooler kit for the 696, and a couple of tools.
Please do not attempt to proceed until you have all three of these components. Smiley



The tools you need are pretty simple:
3mm, 4mm, and 5mm allen keys.
19mm wrench.
8mm wrench.
21mm socket, and a socket wrench and extension to use said socket.
A torque wrench.
An oil filter wrench if your oil filter was put on by a gorilla.
An oil drain pan.

I also used a front and rear lift on the bike so that it would be slightly easier to work on the bike.

So the first thing the instructions tell you is to drain the oil, and remove the oil filter.
You don't need to do that. Just remove the oil filter, and let the little bit of oil drain into the oil pan.
Don't dump out the contents of the oil filter, either, just rest it in the pan under the engine.



Next up, you want to remove the two oil port plugs using the 19mm wrench.



I initially loosened them both a little bit.
Then I fully removed one.



And then the other.



Here they are hanging out on a paper towel.
These parts don't get reused, so feel free to set them aside.



Next up is the "nipple" that the oil filter screws onto.
This requires the 21mm socket, extension, and socket wrench.
Just simply unscrew it.



Next up, you need to remove the plastic shrouds above the horizontal cylinder head.
This requires you to use the 3mm allen key.
There are six little bolts you need to remove.
The 4mm allen bolt and the 8mm wrench are used to separate the charcoal canister from the left cover.
Once the shrouds are unbolted, the center piece unsnaps from the sides.
This is what it looks like when its out of the way.



Now its time to start installing the kit.

Start with the "cooler bypass spring", which goes between the "nipple" that the oil filter screws onto, and the engine block.
The rubber tip on the "cooler bypass spring" blocks a bypass hole.
You want to make sure the opposite end of the "cooler bypass spring" fits in between the tabs in the engine block.
Tighten the "nipple" to 31 ft-lbs.



Next up, you want to install the two oil line guides on the "breather hose cover".
At first, I couldn't figure out what they meant by a "breather hose cover", but I eventually figured out that this is it.



Once the guides are installed installed, it looks like this:



Next up, you need to install two of the oil line "nipples" onto the engine block where you removed the plugs and washers earlier.
Use one of the new washers that come in the kit.
These get torqued to 20 ft-lbs.
Take care when screwing them in that you don't cross thread them. Engine cases are expensive, fragile creatures.



Next up is to install the oil lines at the engine.
There are two little light green o-rings on the end of each line.
I lubed the o-rings with a little bit of engine oil before pressing the tips of the lines into the "nipples".
Screw on the lines, but don't torque them down just yet, as you will need to make some adjustments to the positions of the lines in a little bit.
The oil return line goes to the top "nipple", while the oil delivery line goes to the bottom.



Next up you need to install the other two "nipples" onto the oil cooler, along with the other two washers.
You also need to install the pair of light blue "rubber blocks" onto the oil cooler, and hat shaped spacer into the right "rubber block".
Once that's done, slip the oil cooler onto the mounting point on the frame, and screw the long allen bolt with the red lock-tite on the threads into the hat shaped spacer, into the nut that''s welded onto the frame. Use the 5mm allen key to tighten the allen bolt to the frame.

Once you've done that, route the oil lines up into place, lube the o-rings with oil, and tighten the ring nuts to 18 ft-lbs.
Take great care not to rip the oil line ports right off of the oil cooler. That would totally suck.




Set the oil lines into the guides, and snap them closed.



Also you need to slip a metal clamp around the lines just above the upper guide, and bolt it onto its place on the frame, using the short allen bolt provided in the kit. Use the 5mm allen key to tighten it.

Once that's in place, tighten the ring nuts at the engine block to 18 ft-lbs, and start putting the covers back into place.
Make sure you put all six of the small 3mm allen nuts back into place, and snap the outer covers to the new center cover that came in the kit.





Once the covers are in place, reinstall the oil filter, torquing it down to 11 ft-lbs, or whenever it stops leaking under pressure.



Fire up the engine, and look for any oil leaks while the system is under pressure.
If you don't see any leaks, increase the rpms, and keep looking for leaks.
If still no leaks are found, shut the engine off, let the oil drain back into the bottom of the engine, and check the oil height, topping up the oil as needed to get it as close as you prefer to the top mark. Remember that the bike must have both tires on the ground, and the bike held level to check the oil level properly. Don't try to fill the oil level to the top mark with the bike leaning on the side stand. Yes, people have done that before.

Now take the bike for a test ride, and enjoy your oil cooler!

BC.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2009, 08:08:44 PM by Bladecutter » Logged
DucinKtown
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« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2009, 08:58:18 PM »

Nice thanks < i have enjoyed wrenching on my own bike and this mod was one I was considering doing, now I know how!!!

Which kit did you buy?

Russ
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Bladecutter
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« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2009, 10:23:23 PM »

That's the Ducati kit for the 696.
I had only vaguely seem mention of another one offered by some fart-can car site, but when I went to their site, there was no mention of the kit anywhere, so I dismissed that one as actually being in existence.

BC.
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DucatiSTi
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« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2009, 03:25:44 PM »

FANTASTIC write-up!!! Great instructions and pics.

How does the oil cooler perform? Have you noticed much of a change?

Thanks again waytogo
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2009 696 Monster - Arrow Carbon slip-ons, Bitubo steering damper, DP oil cooler, DP Touring Seat, Rizoma tail chop, Rizoma Zero 11's, Stebel Nautilus horn, Ducati Euro shroud, Speedymoto sliders (axles and frame)
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2009, 10:53:57 PM »

The one from the "fart can" car site is not available through "intensepower". It is only sold through motorcycle retailers. It is however manufactured by "us" fart can guys which include 2 motorcycle racers and one being a mechanical engineer, I guess. It is only available through motowheels.com from this board. Yes the kit does exist and several folks on here have purchased and installed the kit.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2009, 11:22:47 PM by ryanracer » Logged

にもかかわらず、私の車は本当に速いドライブ、私は女性の生殖器のようなバイクに乗る
zedsaid
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« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2009, 12:27:12 PM »

The one from the "fart can" car site is not available through "intensepower". It is only sold through motorcycle retailers. It is however manufactured by "us" fart can guys which include 2 motorcycle racers and one being a mechanical engineer, I guess. It is only available through motowheels.com from this board. Yes the kit does exist and several folks on here have purchased and installed the kit.

Yup, the H Competition Kit, i installed it myself and it's awesome.  Hooks up pretty much the same way, i think there's a thread about it already
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Red 696- You can call her Isabella.
metroplex
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« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2022, 10:32:37 AM »

It's been more than a decade and I can't see the photos anymore. But does anyone have a photo showing the correct way to install that bypass spring plate installed above the oil filter?
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ducpainter
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« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2022, 01:08:28 PM »

This may help...

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metroplex
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« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2022, 05:41:34 PM »

Thank you! I kind of wish I had saved this thread way back in the day. Any chance someone has a PDF of the retrofit procedure?
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